Superwide Screen Used for Multi-Sports Video Wall
Slide 4 of 10


Multiple Views, After

The new design involved flipping the room, so the viewing area wound up being opposite the fireplace wall instead of next to it. And instead of having three separate TVs create a multi-viewing effect, it would all be done on one display—a 115-inch projection screen. “Probably 10 years ago, on one of our first theaters before HD was prevalent, a client wanted something like [multiple displays] and we put in an old security camera quad-viewer on a 110-inch screen,” Duggan recalls. “So it was like four 55-inch screens evenly split, with no manipulating—we did that way back when … what could be cooler?” It wouldn’t require building a new wall, and on the existing wall Duggan could maximize the space by cutting in cavities for front-channel speakers that he could hide behind an acoustically transparent screen, in this case an AcousticPro 4K from Elite Screens. The neat trick Union Place pulled off was using a screen with a super-wide 2.35:1 CinemaScope aspect ratio—ordinarily filled by movies that otherwise leave black top and bottom bars on a traditional 16:9 HDTV screen—to achieve the multi-view effect. By running video feeds through a Rose Electronics HD Quad View Processor, for TV viewing the JVC DLA-RS4800U projector can serve up images from four connected DirecTV receivers, in various arrays.




View the 10 photos in this photo gallery
Superwide Screen Used for Multi-Sports Video Wall